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30 Super-Easy Healthy Dinners That’ll Help You Lose Weight

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You’ll be counting down the minutes ’til you can make these healthy dinner recipes!

When you get home after a long day at work, it can be so tempting to grab takeout or heat up a frozen meal—but don’t even think about it. Instead of sacrificing your health for the sake of convenience, enjoy any one of these super-easy dinners that will be ready in no time and help you shed weight all month long. These healthy dinner recipes are quick, simple, and tasty!

Dinners
2/31 ,
LOADED SPAGHETTI

1 cup sliced bell pepper
1/2 cup sliced red onion
1 tsp olive oil
1 cup cooked whole-wheat spaghetti
2/3 cup cooked edamame

Sauté peppers and onions in oil until onions are translucent. Toss with pasta and edamame.

Total: 420 calories

Soybeans are brimming with hunger-satiating protein and fiber, making them a great pasta topper.

(For even more great healthy-eating ideas that will help you lose weight, check out The Women’s Health Diet.)

3/31 ,
COOKOUT FOR ONE

1 organic beef hot dog
1/2 cup organic baked beans
1 whole-wheat hot dog bun
1/2 Tbsp whole-grain mustard
1/2 Tbsp sweet relish
1 cup sliced honeydew melon

Cook hot dog, and heat baked beans in a saucepan. Serve hot dog in the bun, topped with mustard and relish, with beans and melon on the side.

Total: 490 calories

Your hot dog doesn’t have to be a diet-breaker, so long as you load up on healthy toppings instead of chili and cheese, which can beef up your dog with saturated fat, excess calories, and tons of sodium.

These fun (and healthy!) pita pizza recipes will give you even more healthy-dinner options

4/31 ,
SUMMER FARROTTO

1 boneless, skinless chicken breast (3 oz)
2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
1/4 cup sliced red onion
1 cup diced yellow squash
1/2 cup dry farro
1 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 Tbsp grated Parmesan cheese

Pan-sear chicken in 1 Tbsp oil, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste, then dice. Sauté onion and squash with remaining oil. Stir in farro until coated in oil. Add 2/3 cup water, bring to a boil, stir, reduce heat, and cover. Cook 20 minutes or until soft. Stir in chicken, parsley, and cheese, and serve.

TOTAL: 490 calories

Haven’t tried farro? It’s an Italian grain with a nutty flavor that is packed full of essential nutrients such as magnesium, B vitamins, niacin, zinc, protein, and fiber.

5/31 ,
BEEF AND VEGGIE SALAD BOWL

2 Tbsp dry red quinoa
2 cups mesclun greens
3 oz cooked lean beef, cubed
1/2 cup chopped broccoli florets
1/4 red bell pepper, chopped
2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp red wine vinegar

Cook quinoa as directed. Toss with greens, beef, broccoli, and pepper in a bowl. Whisk oil and vinegar for dressing.

Total: 320 calories

Who needs Mexican fast food with this healthy alterative?

6/31 ,
BOW TIES WITH SPRING VEGETABLES

2 oz dry whole-grain farfalle pasta
2 tsp olive oil
1/2 cup artichoke hearts
1/4 cup sliced red onion
1/4 cup peas
1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint

Cook pasta as directed and toss with oil, vegetables, and mint. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

TOTAL: 370 calories

Full of fiber, those artichoke hearts will help you fill up faster—and stay full. Bye, midnight snacking!

7/31 ,
HALF-HOMEMADE SOUP WITH ASPARAGUS

4 oz boneless, skinless chicken breast
1 cup Amy’s Organic Chunky Vegetable soup
2 Tbsp dry quinoa
1 cup chopped kale
10 small asparagus spears
2 tsp soy sauce
1/8 tsp grated fresh ginger

Bake chicken at 350°F for 25 minutes, then shred with a fork. Meanwhile, combine soup, quinoa, and kale in a saucepan, bring to a boil, and simmer until quinoa is done, about 15 minutes. Add chicken. Steam asparagus, then toss with soy sauce and ginger. Serve asparagus on the side.

TOTAL: 330 calories

A proven anti-inflammatory, fresh ginger is full of antioxidants that boost your immunity, so this soup is perfect for a warm meal when you’re feeling under the weather.

8/31 ,
PORK WITH VEGGIES

1 pork tenderloin (4 oz)
1 cup steamed green beans
2 Tbsp sliced almonds
1 baked sweet potato

Season pork with salt and pepper, sear in an ovenproof skillet coated with cooking spray, and transfer to a 450°F oven for 15 minutes. Slice and serve with green beans topped with almonds, and a sweet potato.

Total: 370 calories

Did you know that sweet potatoes pack 438 percent of your daily value of infection-fighting vitamin A? Not bad for a delicious side dish.

9/31 ,
PIZZA PARTY

1 Amy’s Light ‘N Lean Italian Vegetable Pizza
3 oz broccoli slaw
1/4 cup black beans
1/4 cup sliced scallions
1 tsp olive oil
1 oz lemon juice

Bake pizza. Blend slaw, beans, scallions, oil, and lemon juice, and serve on the side.

Total: 400 calories

This pizza only costs you 280 calories. A fast-food personal pie? Double that.

 

10/31 ,
BAKED CHICKEN WITH MUSHROOMS AND SWEET POTATO

1/2 skinless chicken breast
1 cup baby portobello mushrooms, sliced
1 Tbsp chives
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 medium sweet potato

In a 350°F oven, bake chicken, topped with mushrooms, chives, and oil, for 15 minutes. Microwave sweet potato for five to seven minutes.

Total: 382 calories

Sweet potatoes have a lower glycemic index than white spuds do, so they’re gentler on your blood sugar—and potentially your waistline.

11/31 ,
SHRIMP CEVICHE

1/2 cup chopped cucumber
1/3 cup chopped jicama
1/3 cup chopped mango
1 Tbsp chopped onion
1/4 cup sliced avocado
1 tomato, sliced
1 cup cooked shrimp
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 tsp red pepper

Toss together, and dress with lemon juice.

Total: 430 calories

Avocado‘s monounsaturated fats may play a role in warding off belly fat.

12/31 ,
LIGHT LASAGNA

1/2 cup cooked whole-wheat spaghetti
1/4 cup part-skim ricotta
1/3 cup prepared tomato sauce
1/2 tsp crushed red chili flakes
1 Coleman Natural Mild Italian Chicken Sausage link, cooked
2 cups spinach

Combine pasta, ricotta, sauce, and chili flakes, then crumble sausage on top. Add spinach, and let wilt.

Total: 350 calories

Whole-wheat pastas have more fiber than their empty-calorie, white-flour counterparts.

13/31 ,
CHICKEN WITH CHEESY BROCCOLI SOUP

1 cup chopped broccoli
1 cup chopped parsnips
3/4 cup nonfat chicken stock
1/4 cup low-fat shredded cheddar cheese
1 Tbsp sliced almonds
4 oz chicken breast
1 tsp lemon juice
Salt and pepper, to taste

Steam broccoli and parsnips, then puree with stock and cheddar; sprinkle with nuts. Bake chicken, top with lemon juice, and season.

Total: 360 calories

Clear soups can help fill you up, but pureed ones taste richer, which can be more satiating.

 

14/31 ,
CILANTRO SHRIMP WITH SQUASH, CHARD, AND WILD RICE

8 large shrimp
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 tsp fresh cilantro
2 tsp fresh lime juice
1 yellow squash, sliced
1 cup Swiss chard
1/4 cup dry wild rice blend

Sear shrimp in olive oil over medium heat for three to four minutes, seasoning with cilantro and lime juice. Steam squash and chard for five to seven minutes, and cook rice according to package directions.

Total: 370 calories

With fewer calories per ounce than most fish, shrimp are the ideal seafood if you’re trying to slim down.

15/31 ,
LEMON CHICKEN WITH GAZPACHO

3 1/2 oz chicken breast
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 lemon, sliced
1 tsp fresh rosemary

Gazpacho
1 cup stewed tomatoes
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup cucumber, chopped
1/4 cup green pepper, chopped
1 Tbsp white wine vinegar

Coat chicken with olive oil. Cover with lemon slices and rosemary, and bake at 350°F for 25 to 30 minutes. Combine gazpacho ingredients in a blender, then serve at room temperature with chicken.

Total: 414 calories

Garlic does more than add flavor: It may help boost weight loss and reduce body fat.

16/31 ,
ZESTY TOFU AND QUINOA

1 cup cooked quinoa
2 oz extra-firm tofu, cubed
3 Tbsp diced red pepper
3 Tbsp diced green pepper
1 tsp cilantro
2 Tbsp diced avocado
2 tsp fresh lime juice

Combine all ingredients.

Total: 320 calories

Lime juice not only adds zing to this dish—it also adds antioxidants that can wipe out stress, fight the signs of aging, and rejuvenate your body and mind.

17/31 ,
CONFETTI PESTO PASTA

1/4 pint cherry tomatoes
1/3 cup cooked green beans
1/3 cup diced chicken breast
1/4 cup pesto sauce
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 cup cooked linguine
1/4 cup shredded Parmesan

Combine tomatoes, cooked green beans, diced chicken breast, pesto sauce, and salt and pepper in a bowl. Add cooked linguine. Garnish with shredded Parmesan.

Total: 417 calories

This easy dish can be made in under five minutes!

18/31 ,
ASIAN TURKEY LETTUCE CUPS

4 oz ground lean turkey
1/2 cup white mushrooms, chopped
1 tsp minced garlic
1/4 cup shelled and cooked edamame
2 Boston lettuce leaves
2 Tbsp sliced scallion

Sauce
1/2 Tbsp hoisin sauce
1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 tsp rice vinegar

Asian Slaw
1/2 cup shredded red cabbage and green cabbage
1/4 cup sliced jicama
1/4 cup grated carrot
1 tsp olive oil
1/2 tsp rice vinegar

In a nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray, sauté first three ingredients for five minutes. Add edamame, scoop mix onto lettuce, top with scallion, and wrap up. Drizzle with sauce, and serve slaw on the side.

Total: 329 calories

Substituting mushrooms for some of the meat in the dish saves fat and calories. Plus, you won’t compensate by eating more later, a 2008 study reported.

19/31 ,
PORK WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES

3 oz pork tenderloin
1 cup baked cubed butternut squash
2 cups brussels sprouts cooked in 1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper

Roast pork tenderloin at 375°F, then serve with vegetables.

Total: 405 calories

Brussels sprouts contain quercetin, a flavonol that may reduce belly fat and help you fend off extra pounds.

20/31 ,
MUSHROOM BISON BURGER

4 oz grass-fed bison burger
1 portobello mushroom, grilled
1 slice red onion
2 slices tomato
2 lettuce leaves
1 Arnold Artisan Ovens Multi-Grain Flatbreat

Grill mushroom and burger, and top with onion, tomato, and lettuce on flatbread.

Total: 374 calories

Grass-fed bison meat contains less fat than both ground chicken and grass-fed beef—plus it has more protein.

21/31 ,
SALMON WITH LEMON AND DILL

5 oz wild Atlantic salmon
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp dill
2/3 cup parsnips
1 1/2 cup chopped broccoli, steamed

Sprinkle salmon with lemon juice and dill and bake for 15 minutes at 225°F.

Total: 261 calories

Chow down—broccoli contains quercetin, which inhibits the maturation of fat cells.

22/31 ,
SHRIMP PASTA WITH SALAD

1/2 cup dry rigatoni, cooked
3 oz shrimp, poached
1/2 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained and pureed
3 large black olives, sliced
1/2 Tbsp pine nuts
2 tsp grated Parmesan

Salad
1 cup romaine lettuce
1/4 cup chopped tomato
1/2 cup sliced cucumber
1/2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

Toss pasta with shrimp, sun-dried tomatoes, olives, and pine nuts. Top with Parmesan. Serve alongside the salad.

Total: 465 calories

Pine nuts increase your body’s secretion of satiety hormones and may short-circuit your appetite.

23/31 ,
SEARED SCALLOPS WITH LEMON JUICE AND SAGE

2 tsp canola oil
3 oz sea scallops
2 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground sage
1 1/2 cups cubed roasted acorn squash
2 cups kale sautéed in 2 tsp olive oil

Heat canola oil in a large nonstick skillet over high heat. Add scallops and cook without stirring until well browned, around two minutes. Flip scallops and cook until the sides are firm and centers opaque, 30 to 90 seconds. Drizzle with lemon juice, and sprinkle sage on top. Serve with squash and kale.

Total: 496 calories

These mollusks are high in satisfying protein and can help you lose weight: In a University of Washington School of Medicine study, people who increased their protein intake from 15 percent to 30 percent of their daily calories lost eight pounds of fat in 12 weeks.

24/31 ,
CHEESY VEGGIE PASTA

1/2 cup whole-wheat macaroni
1 cup crushed whole, peeled canned tomatoes
1/2 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
3/4 cup chopped spinach
1 cup zucchini wedges
2 tsp olive oil

Cook vegetables over medium-high heat, then combine with cooked macaroni and cheese.

Total: 439 calories

Go meatless once a week! According to a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating less meat may help keep your weight in check.

25/31 ,
TERIYAKI BEEF WITH VEGGIES

3 oz grass-fed beef tenderloin, cubed
2 Tbsp reduced-sodium teriyaki sauce
1 Tbsp light honey-mustard dressing
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 cup sliced carrots
1/2 cup chopped broccoli
1/4 cup sliced water chestnuts
1/4 cup sliced peppers
1/2 cup cooked brown rice

Marinate beef in teriyaki and dressing for 30 minutes. Heat olive oil in a pan, and cook beef one to two minutes. Add veggies, and cook for another five to seven minutes until beef is browned. Serve over rice.

Total: 506 calories

Beef from cows that graze on grass has higher amounts of conjugated linoleic acid, which can help fight body fat.

26/31 ,
SHRIMP AND BROCCOLI PASTA SALAD

4 oz cooked shrimp
1/2 cup cooked whole-wheat elbow macaroni
1/2 steamed broccoli
4 sun-dried tomatoes, halved
1 tsp capers
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp oregano

Toss all ingredients, and serve cold.

Total: 312 calories

Shrimp is high in omega-3’s, and according to a study in the journal Appetite, people who ate omega-3-rich diets were most likely to feel satiated.

27/31 ,
CHICKEN PARMIGIANA WITH PENNE

4 oz grilled chicken, diced
1/2 cup tomato sauce
1 cup spinach
1/2 cup whole-wheat penne
1 1/2 Tbsp grated Parmesan

Sauté spinach in one teaspoon olive oil, and toss with chicken, penne, and tomato sauce. Top with Parmesan.

Total: 437 calories

Spinach contains lipoic acid, which plays a role in energy production and may help regulate blood sugar levels.

28/31 ,
BEEF STIR-FRY WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

3 oz steak tenderloin fillet, sliced thin
1/2 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms
1/2 onion, sliced
2 tsp olive oil
1/3 cup cooked bulgur

Butternut Squash Soup
1/2 cup Pacific Natural Foods organic light-sodium butternut squash soup

Stir-fry beef, onion, and mushroom, and serve over bulgur.

Total: 450 calories

Bulgur is a quick-cooking, nutty-tasting whole grain that’s lower in calories and fat than brown rice.

29/31 ,
ASIAN SNAPPER

1/4 cup raw pistachios
1/2 cup cooked millet
1/2 cup bok choy
6 oz cooked snapper
4 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
2 tsp sesame seeds
1/2 cup sugar snap peas, cooked

Mix pistachios into millet. Top millet with bok choy and then snapper. Drizzle snapper with soy sauce, and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve sugar snap peas on the side.

Total: 561 calories

In a study, those who added pistachios to their diet lowered their body-mass indexes more than those who ate pretzels instead.

30/31 ,
JAMBALAYA BLEND WITH VEGGIES

1 veggie burger
1/2 cup cooked brown rice
2 Tbsp corn
2 Tbsp salsa
1/2 cup chopped red, green, or yellow bell peppers
3/4 cup diced squash
3/4 cup diced zucchini
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 tsp olive oil
Salt, to taste

Cook burger in pan spritzed with cooking spray, then chop burger and combine with rice, corn, and salsa. Toss veggies with oil and salt, roast for 15 to 20 minutes, and serve on the side.

Total: 360 calories

Fill up with brown rice. It has more than five times the fiber of the white stuff.

31/31 ,
COD WITH ROSEMARY POLENTA AND BEANS

3 oz cod
1 tsp chopped fresh parsley
Dash of salt
Dash of pepper
1/4 cup dry polenta
1/2 cup 1 percent milk
1 Tbsp pine nuts
1/2 tsp rosemary
1/2 cup cooked green beans

Season cod with parsley, salt, and pepper, then steam for eight minutes. Cook polenta with milk, per package instructions, then top with pine nuts and rosemary. Serve with green beans.

Total: 352 calories

Fight flab with flavor: Rosemary‘s carnosic acid appears to help reduce weight gain.

Source: www.womenshealthmag.com

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Healty and tips

3 rules to follow at breakfast to lose weight.

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Eating nothing in the morning is as bad as eating anything. A balanced breakfast that often contradicts the most common habits helps to lose weight and ensure satiety until lunch without problem.

Atlantico: A healthy and balanced breakfast is a first step to regain control of your daily diet and can help us lose weight. What advice would you give that breakfast is a first step in weight loss?

Leaking refined foods with a high glycemic index
Consume breakfasts that are vectors of vitamins, fibers and minerals like the Miam-Ô-Fruit of France Guillain or a house muesli made of barley flakes, pruned almonds, dried apricots, cinnamon, acacia honey , wheat germ and an almond or oat drink. For salty mouths, dare the egg to shell, the slice of poultry or ham (not too often for the ecological impact!), The cheese (for those who tolerate it) with slices of sourdough bread or a full bowl of rice and a rapeseed oil.

Escape the fruit juices especially that of oranges which are real aggressions for the digestive tract, more or less rich in sugar and perfectly indigestible with any type of cereals.
Teas, maté, infusions and coffees of quality are preferable in small volume (200ml max).
Your breakfast should be consumed calmly with chewing applied.
What is the influence of what we eat in the morning on our choices for subsequent meals?

Charles-Antoine Winter: The influence would be rather a consequence … Understand that in the morning, on the blows of 6 to 8h, our body knows its highest concentration of fasting hormone cortisol (in this case, nocturnal fasting ), allowing us to maintain a glucose level (glucose level in our blood) correct without food intake and especially of carbohydrate origin. In other words, your body is on an autonomous metabolism. And this means knowing how to get out of it as wisely as possible.

Here are two possibilities: one where you submerge it of sweetness with an excess of sugar and make it dependent (circuit of the reward). And the other where you empower him with nutrients that require him to work as a team and therefore an autonomy.

Indeed, one of the most harmful and maintained habits in France is the breakfast rich in sugar, in empty calories. Intake of fiber-free sugar at breakfast will inevitably cause hyperglycemia, an excess of sugar circulating in your blood. And your body being in danger, will react to excess by secreting too much insulin, the latter being responsible for the use of sugar by your neurons, muscles, red blood cells (positive point) but also by the conversion of l excess sugar in fat. Worse yet, your sweet breakfast will be responsible, via insulin, morning cravings, your addiction to coffee, your oversized and / or unbalanced lunches. A day that starts and may end on the reward scheme …

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How to cut in Julienne I knife skills

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West Africa’s Tea Culture – a Way of Life

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The term “tea ceremony” usually conjures up mental images of formal rituals in old Japan, or more modern ones in India or Malaysia where business deals are struck over a pot of tea and a handshake. In West Africa, ancient tea ceremony goes by the name “attaya,” and is anything but formal. In fact, tea culture in the continent’s western nations of Gambia, Mauritania and Senegal are the polar opposite of Japan’s ceremonies, where matcha tea is the focal point of a semi-religious event.

Tea

The attaya is more accurately described as a tea ritual or social function akin to a very informal wine-tasting session or round of toasts in Western cultures. Something like 80 percent of all West African children and adults drink tea on a daily basis, most of it being some variety of mint tea made in a way that likely originated among the ancient Moors.

French, Arabic, a little English, and local dialects are interwoven in everyday West African speech; and that makes for colorful, loud and friendly conversations during the traditional three rounds of tea in a typical attaya ceremony.

Despite its wide practice throughout West Africa, centering on Senegal, the attaya ceremony is largely unknown in the West. Here are some key facts that explain how the tea is made and served, how people interact while drinking it, and how to make a pot of West African tea that is “attaya-ready.”

Background

The preparation of typical Senegalese mint tea, the kind used in the attaya ritual, takes quite a while, and is not as easy as preparing other kinds of tea. This is partly by design, enabling everyone to have a long conversation while the tea is being heated and mixed. Mint tea is a natural preventive for cavities and several other dental problems.

Ceremony and history

Every African attaya ceremony consists of three rounds. Tea is served in small glasses (not cups) with each round being quite different in taste. Legend has it that the first, bitter round represents the beginning of life and the difficulties of growing up. The second round is sweeter but retains the strong mint flavor. The third and final round is mostly very weak tea with plenty of sugar. The second round is said to signify the sweetness of mid-life, love, and marriage, with the final round being symbolic of old age. There are hundreds of historic stories about what each round means, but they all point to some version of “stages of life.”

Almost all the words related to African tea ceremony, including the word “attaya” itself, are Arabic in origin because the early Moors are thought to have perfected the art of preparing sweet mint tea. The Senegalese language is largely derived from Arabic. The best-known English word that comes directly from Senegalese is also food-and-drink related; “yummy.”

Tea culture in West Africa

Tea is always served to visitors in West African homes, but more commonly it is drunk during social gatherings at restaurants, on street corners, in alleyways, wherever people meet to talk and socialize.

There are dozens of ways to prepare African mint tea for attaya, but the most common one calls for a large pot of boiling water (preferably over a charcoal fire) to which is added green tea leaves, mint leaves and a generous dose of sugar. After a long boiling period, the tea is mixed by pouring it to and from the glasses several times. This distributes the sugar and mint evenly.

Good African mint tea has lots of foam on top. This is a result of the pouring process (see above) but it is usually less thick during the second and third rounds as the concoction weakens.

It is said that in many West African nations potential burglars and thieves will steer clear of homes and businesses if they smell mint tea being brewed in the evening. That’s because night watchmen and late-shift police typically drink strong mint tea to stay awake. The first round alone is enough to keep a person’s eyes wide open for several hours.

Taste and preparation

The taste of the tea depends on the preparer. Talented tea-makers in Senegal and neighboring countries usually do a careful head count before preparation. That way, they can calibrate the amount of sugar, tea leaves and mint to use, as well as how much water to prepare. Considering that each person will be drinking about 20 ounces of tea over a 2-hour period, very large pots are used when there are more than a few guests.

Because the caffeine content is so high, African-style mint tea is never served on an empty stomach, but always after meals. And contrary to almost every other nation’s tea-drinking practices, West African attaya attendees slurp and gulp their tea rather quickly. The socializing takes place between rounds of drinking rather than during. All of which means that a typical attaya 3-round ritual will include no less than 2 or three sessions of chatting that are each about 30 minutes long.

“Free speech” is the only rule

During an attaya session, guests are expected to express their opinion about the tea, saying whether they think it too strong, too weak or just right. Unlike in Western cultures, it is not considered rude to speak one’s mind about the quality of the tea at an attaya. “Wow, that’s way too strong for me,” and “Is this water or tea?” (during the third round) are routine comments from attaya participants, all of which bring either laughter or a reasoned response from the preparer, like “Well, you Brits and Americans are too weak to drink ‘real’ African tea. Hahahaha.”

Many Westerners are taken aback when they realize that West African attaya sessions are truly free-wheeling affairs, where just about any subject is fair game for discussion, and friendly argumentation is even encouraged and appreciated. (Contrast this with Japanese tea ceremony!)

It’s interesting to note the differences between the world’s most ritualized, formal matcha tea ceremonies of Japan and the much looser, socializing tone of West Africa’s attaya. In the former, virtually every word and action is prescribed by tradition. In a typical attaya, a street vendor might prepare the three rounds of mint tea with varying amounts of sugar and much chatter between host and guests.

Regardless of these obvious differences, West African attaya is one of the most colorful and interesting “tea ceremonies” on earth; and everyone should experience the camaraderie and good cheer that accompanies each glass of African mint served during attaya.

Source: matcha-tea.com

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