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Healty and tips

The top 25 Healthy Fruits: Blueberries, Apples, Cherries, Bananas and 21 more Healthy picks

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Few things compare to the sweetness of fresh-picked strawberries or the luscious first bite of watermelon that leaves juice dripping down your chin.

Fruits are not only delicious but healthful too. Rich in vitamins A and C, plus folate and other essential nutrients, they may help prevent heart disease and stroke, control blood pressure and cholesterol, prevent some types of cancer and guard against vision loss. They’re so good for you that Health Canada recommends that most women get seven or eight servings of fruit and vegetables each day.

If it’s the vitamins that promote good health, you may wonder if you can just pop supplements. Nope. Sun-drenched peaches and vine-ripened grapes contain more than just vitamins; they’re a complex combination of fibre, minerals, antioxidants and phytochemicals – as well as the vitamins – that work in combination to provide protective benefits. You can’t get all that from a pill.

All fruits offer health benefits, but the following 25 stand out as nutrient-dense powerhouses with the most disease-fighting potential. (Note: Only the best sources of each vitamin, mineral and antioxidant are listed in the « nutritional value » section.)

Apple  
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 75 calories, 3 g fibre
• Disease-fighting factor: Apples contain antioxidants called flavonoids, which may help lower the chance of developing diabetes and asthma. Apples are also a natural mouth freshener and clean your teeth with each crunchy bite.
• Did you know? An apple’s flavour and aroma comes from fragrance cells in apple skin, so for maximum flavour, don’t peel your apple. Plus, the vitamins lie just beneath the skin.

Avocado 
• Nutritional value ( ½ avocado): 114 calories, 4.5 g fibre, source of vitamin E and folate
• Disease-fighting factor: Avocados contain healthy monounsaturated fats that can help lower cholesterol levels when eaten instead of harmful saturated fats. For a heart-healthy boost, replace butter with avocado on your favourite sandwich.
• Did you know? Babies love avocados. Their soft, creamy texture makes them easy to eat, and their high fat content helps with normal infant growth and development.

Banana 
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 105 calories, 3 g fibre, source of vitamin B6, potassium and folate
• Disease-fighting factor: With 422 milligrams of potassium per banana, these sweet delights have more potassium than most fruit and may help lower blood pressure levels.
• Did you know? People with rubber latex allergies may also be allergic to bananas since the two come from similar trees and share a common protein.

Blackberry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 
31 calories, 4 g fibre, rich in antioxidants
• Disease-fighting factor: Blackberries get their deep purple colour from the powerful antioxidant anthocyanin, which may help reduce the risk of stroke and cancer. Studies show that blackberry extract may help stop the growth of lung cancer cells.
• Did you know? The ancient Greeks called blackberries « gout-berries » and used them to treat gout-related symptoms.

Page 1 of 5Blueberry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 41 calories, 1.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants
• Disease-fighting factor: Blueberries rank No. 1 in antioxidant activity when compared to 60 other fresh fruits and vegetables. Blueberries may help lower the risk of developing age-related diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
• Did you know? Blueberries freeze very well. Here’s how: Rinse, then let berries dry in a single layer on towels. Freeze in a single layer on rimmed baking sheets. Seal in freezer-safe containers for up to one year. Use them straight from the freezer in your morning cereal, blend them into a smoothie or mix into pancake or muffin batter. (You can also buy frozen blueberries year-round.)

The serving size listed for each fruit in our glossary counts as one serving in Canada’s Food Guide. The number of servings you need each day depends on your age and gender. For example, women between the ages of 19 and 50 need seven to eight servings of fruit and vegetables each day (three fruit and four vegetable servings would suffice). To determine the correct number of vegetable and fruit servings for you, visit the Health Canada website (www.hc-sc.gc.ca) at and search for « food guide. »

Cantaloupe
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL):
 25 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of vitamin A, folate and potassium
• Disease-fighting factor: Cantaloupe is high in the antioxidant beta-carotene, which may help reduce the risk of developing cataracts. Cantaloupe is a perfect diet food since it has about half the calories of most other fruits.
• Did you know? Since bacteria can grow on the outside rind, it is important to wash cantaloupe before cutting into it.

Cherry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 46 calories, 1.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants
• Disease-fighting factor: Sour cherries contain more of the potent antioxidantanthocyanin than any other fruit. Anthocyanin may help reduce inflammation and ease the pain of arthritis and gout.
• Did you know? Sour cherries, commonly used in pie and jam, have more vitamin C than sweet cherries do, but much of it is lost when they are heated.

Cranberry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 25 calories, 2.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants
• Disease-fighting factor: Cranberries are antibacterial and studies show that they can help treat and prevent urinary tract infections. Recent research has also linked cranberries to the prevention of kidney stones and ulcers.
• Did you know? Unsweetened cranberry juice makes an excellent mouthwash – studies show it can help kill bacteria and fight cavities.

Fig (dried)
• Nutritional value (2 dried figs): 42 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of potassium, calcium and iron
• Disease-fighting factor: High in fibre, figs may help reduce the risk of heart disease.
• Did you know? Puréed figs make an excellent substitute for fat (like butter or oil) in baked goods. Simply purée 1 cup (250 mL) of dried figs with 1/4 cup (50 mL) of water, then replace half of the fat called for in the recipe with an equal amount of the fig mixture.

Goji berry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 90 calories, 2.5 g fibre, source of vitamin A,
rich in antioxidants
• Disease-fighting factor: Goji berries are a nutrient powerhouse, containing six vitamins, 21 minerals and a slew of antioxidants. They have been linked to the prevention of diabetes and cancer, but more research is needed to understand their effects.
• Did you know? Dried goji berries, which look like dried cranberries, can be found in most health food and bulk stores.
Note: Health Canada has warned people using the prescription drug Warfarin to avoid goji berries, because they can alter the drug’s effectiveness.

Frozen fruit
If your favourite fresh fruit is only available for six weeks of the year, head to the frozen food aisle. Grocery store freezers house a variety of affordable frozen fruit, ranging from cubed mango to woodland blueberries to tropical fruit salad.

Not only is frozen fruit convenient, but it’s also equally nutritious – if not more so – than its fresh counterpart. Fresh fruit starts to lose nutrients as soon as it’s picked. The time between harvest and consumption can be long enough for significant nutrient losses to occur. Frozen fruit, however, is picked and frozen immediately, retaining much of the nutrient value. Plus, since frozen fruit is already washed, peeled and cut, it’s a breeze to use. It can be thawed at room temperature or defrosted in the microwave. Once defrosted, eat it as you would fresh fruit, or use it atop cereal, mixed in yogurt or blended into smoothies.

Grape
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/ 125 mL): 53 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of manganese
• Disease-fighting factor: Grapes contain resveratrol, an antioxidant that may help prevent heart disease by reducing blood pressure levels and lowering the risk of blood clots. Resveratrol may also help stop the spread of breast, stomach and colon cancer cells.
• Did you know? You can freeze red and green grapes and use them as colourful ice cubes in your favourite drinks. They add a special touch to sparkling water or Champagne.

Grapefruit (pink) 
• Nutritional value (1/2 grapefruit): 52 calories, 2 g fibre, source of vitamin A
• Disease-fighting factor: Pink grapefruit contains lycopene and flavonoids, which may help protect against some types of cancer. Grapefruit also boasts an ample supply of pectin, a soluble fibre that may help lower cholesterol levels.
• Did you know? Grapefruit can heighten the effect of certain drugs, including cholesterol-lowering statins. Check with your pharmacist to see if grapefruit may interfere with any of your medications.

Kiwifruit
• Nutritional value (1 large): 56 calories, 3 g fibre, source of vitamins C and E, and of magnesium and potassium
• Disease-fighting factor: With more vitamin C than oranges, kiwis can help in the development and maintenance of bones, cartilage, teeth and gums. They can also help lower blood triglyceride levels (high triglycerides increase the risk of heart disease).
• Did you know? Most people remove the fuzzy skin, but kiwis can actually be eaten whole – skin and all.

Mango
• Nutritional value (1/2 medium): 54 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of vitamins A and E
• Disease-fighting factor: Mangoes are high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which may help protect vision and reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (the leading cause of blindness in adults).
• Did you know? Mangoes can be enjoyed ripe as a sweet, juicy dessert choice or unripe as a sour, crunchy addition to chutney and salads. 

Orange
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 62 calories, 3 g fibre, source of vitamin C, folate and potassium
• Disease-fighting factor: Oranges are a good source of folate, an important vitamin for pregnant women that can help prevent neural tube defects in their infants. They also contain a phytochemical called hesperidin, which may lower triglyceride and blood cholesterol levels.
• Did you know? The edible white part of the orange rind has nearly the same amount of vitamin C as the flesh, so eat that part too!

Papaya
• Nutritional value (1/2 medium): 59 calories, 3 g fibre, source of folate, vitamins A and C
• Disease-fighting factor: Papayas contain papain, an enzyme that aids digestion. Plus, their high vitamin A content aids in maintaining the health of the skin.
• Did you know? The black seeds inside the papaya are edible and have a sharp, spicy flavour. Try blending them into salad dressing as a substitute for black pepper.

Peach
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 58 calories, 2 g fibre, source of vitamin A
• Disease-fighting factor: High in vitamin A, peaches help regulate the immune systemand can help fight off infections.
• Did you know? Peaches do not get any sweeter once they have been picked, so avoid buying underripe peaches.

Pear
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 96 calories, 5 g fibre
• Disease-fighting factor: Much of the fibre found in pears is soluble, which can help prevent constipation. Soluble fibre may also help reduce blood cholesterol levels and prevent heart disease.
• Did you know? Unlike most other fruits, pears don’t ripen well on the tree. Instead, pears are harvested when mature and are allowed to finish ripening under controlled conditions.

Pineapple
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 40 calories, 1 g fibre
• Disease-fighting factor: Pineapple contains a natural enzyme called bromelain, which breaks down protein and helps aid digestion. Bromelain may also help prevent blood clots, inhibit growth of cancer cells and speed wound healing.
• Did you know? Since bromelain breaks down protein, pineapple juice makes an excellent marinade and tenderizer for meat.

Pomegranate
• Nutritional value (1/2 fruit): 53 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of vitamin A and potassium
• Disease-fighting factor: Pomegranates contain antioxidant tannins, which may protect the heart. Studies show that daily consumption of pomegranate juice may promote normal blood pressure levels and reduce the risk of heart attacks.
• Did you know? Pomegranates contain glistening, jewel-like seeds called arils that can be pressed into juice. One medium pomegranate yields about 1/2 cup (125 mL) of juice.

Page 4 of 5Prune
• Nutritional value (3 prunes): 60 calories, 2 g fibre, source of vitamin A
• Disease-fighting factor: Prunes are a source of the mineral boron, which may help prevent osteoporosis. Prunes also impart a mild laxative effect due to their high content of a natural sugar called sorbitol.
• Did you know? Marketers in the United States are trying to legally rename prunes « dried plums » to appeal to a younger market.

Raspberry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 32 calories, 4 g fibre, source of folate and magnesium
• Disease-fighting factor: Raspberries are rich in ellagic acid, an antioxidant that may help prevent cervical cancer. Promising studies in animals have led researchers to believe that raspberries may also help treat esophageal and colon cancer.
• Did you know? Raspberries are so perishable that only three per cent of Canada’s raspberry crop is sold fresh. The remaining berries are used to make jam, baked goods and other delicacies.

Strawberry
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 23 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of vitamin C
• Disease-fighting factor: Strawberries are rich in several antioxidants that have
anti-inflammatory properties, including helping to prevent atherosclerosis (hardened arteries) and to suppress the progression of cancerous tumours.
• Did you know? The flavour and colour of strawberries is enhanced by balsamic vinegar. For a fabulous dessert, drizzle balsamic vinegar over ripe strawberries and serve with vanilla ice cream.

Tomato
• Nutritional value (1 medium): 22 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of vitamin A, folate and potassium
• Disease-fighting factor: Tomatoes are nature’s best source of lycopene, a potent antioxidant that may help reduce cholesterol levels and protect against advanced-stage prostate cancer.
• Did you know? Tomatoes cooked with a touch of oil provide more lycopene than raw tomatoes, so a rich tomato sauce made with olive oil is a healthy choice.

Watermelon
• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 23 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of vitamin A
• Disease-fighting factor: Watermelon is 92 per cent water, making it aptly named. It’s a great addition to any weight-loss diet because it is low in calories and satisfies the sweet tooth.
• Did you know? Watermelon rinds and seeds are both edible. Roasted, seasoned seeds make a great snack food, and the juicy rind can be stir-fried, stewed, or pickled.

Glossary
Phytochemicals: Most of the more than 1,000 known phytochemicals have antioxidant properties that help protect our cells against disease-causing damage. Phytochemicals are often identified by their colour (for example, the purple-hued anthocyanins in blackberries and the red lycopene in tomatoes). Each colourful phytochemical provides a different health benefit to the body, so for the best protection against a variety of diseases, choose an array of colourful fruits each day.

Free radicals: Harmful molecules that occur naturally in the body or that come from pesticides, pollution, smoking and radiation. They damage the body’s cells, which can lead to cancer and heart disease.

Antioxidants: Powerful substances that can protect the body against the harmful effects of free radicals. Some of the vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals found in fruit can act as antioxidants.

Source : www.canadianliving.com

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Healty and tips

33 Simple Diet and Fitness Tips

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Diet and workout tips that work

We all want to be our fittest selves, but with so much advice floating around out there, it can be hard to hone in on what healthcare tips actually work. To make your life a bit easier, we’ve rounded up a number of our go-to healthy strategies, to help you reach your most ambitious fitness goals even quicker.

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Say hello to H20

Whether you’re heading off to spin class, boot camp, or any other exercise, it’s always important to hydrate so you can stay energized and have your best workout. Electrolyte-loaded athletic drinks, though, can be a source of unnecessary calories, so « drinking water is usually fine until you’re exercising for more than one hour, » says Newgent. At that point, feel free to go for regular Gatorade-type drinks (and their calories), which can give you a beneficial replenishment boost. But worry not if you like a little flavor during your fitness: There are now lower- cal sports drinks available, adds Newgent, so look out for ’em in your grocery aisles.

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Find the best fitness friend

A workout buddy is hugely helpful for keeping motivated, but it’s important to find someone who will inspire—not discourage. So make a list of all your exercise-loving friends, then see who fits this criteria, says Andrew Kastor, an ASICS running coach: Can your pal meet to exercise on a regular basis? Is she supportive (not disparaging) of your goals? And last, will your bud be able to keep up with you or even push your limits in key workouts? If you’ve got someone that fits all three, make that phone call.
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Stock up on these

While there are heaps of good-for-you foods out there, some key ingredients make it a lot easier to meet your weight-loss goals. Next grocery store run, be sure to place Newgent’s top three diet-friendly items in your cart: balsamic vinegar (it adds a pop of low-cal flavor to veggies and salads), in-shell nuts (their protein and fiber keep you satiated), and fat-free plain yogurt (a creamy, comforting source of protein). « Plus, Greek yogurt also works wonders as a natural low-calorie base for dressings and dips—or as a tangier alternative to sour cream, » says Newgent. Talk about a multitasker!
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Relieve those achy muscles

After a grueling workout, there’s a good chance you’re going to be feeling it (we’re talking sore thighs, tight calves). Relieve post-fitness aches by submerging your lower body in a cold bath (50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit; you may have to throw some ice cubes in to get it cold enough) for 10 to 15 minutes. « Many top athletes use this trick to help reduce soreness after training sessions, » says Andrew Kastor. And advice we love: « An athlete training for an important race should consider getting one to two massages per month to help aid in training recovery, » adds Kastor. Now that’s speaking our language!
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Curb your sweet tooth

Got a late-night sugar craving that just won’t quit? « To satisfy your sweet tooth without pushing yourself over the calorie edge, even in the late night hours, think ‘fruit first,' » says Jackie Newgent, RD, author of The Big Green Cookbook. So resist that chocolate cake siren, and instead enjoy a sliced apple with a tablespoon of nut butter (like peanut or almond) or fresh fig halves spread with ricotta. Then sleep sweet, knowing you’re still on the right, healthy track.
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Buy comfy sneaks

You shouldn’t buy kicks that hurt, bottom line! « Your shoes should feel comfortable from the first step, » says Andrew Kastor. So shop in the evening—your feet swell during the day and stop in the late afternoon, so you want to shop when they’re at their biggest. Also make sure the sneaks are a little roomy—enough so that you can wiggle your toes, but no more than that. They should be comfy from the get-go, but Kastor says they’ll be even more so once you have a good 20 to 40 miles on ’em.
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Pick your perfect tunes

Running with music is a great way to get in a groove (just make sure it’s not blasting too loudly, or you won’t hear those cars!). To pick the ultimate iPod playlist, think about what gets you going. « I know several elite athletes that listen to what we’d consider ‘relaxing’ music, such as symphony music, while they do a hard workout, » says Andrew Kastor. So don’t feel like you have to download Lady Gaga because her tunes are supposed to pump you up—go with any music that you find uplifting.
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When to weigh

You’ve been following your diet for a whole week. Weigh to go! Now it’s time to start tracking your progress (and make sure pesky pounds don’t find their way back on). « It’s best to step on the scale in the morning before eating or drinking—and prior to plunging into your daily activities, » says Newgent. For the most reliable number, be sure to check your poundage at a consistent time, whether daily or weekly.
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Police your portions

Does your steak take up more than half your plate? Think about cutting your serving of beef in half. That’s because it’s best to try and fill half your plate with veggies or a mixture of veggies and fresh fruit, says Newgent, so that it’s harder to overdo it on the more caloric dishes (like cheesy potatoes or barbecue sauce–slathered ribs—yum!).
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Combat cocktail hour

Is it ladies’ night? If you know you’ll be imbibing more than one drink, feel (and sip!) right by always ordering water between cocktails, says Newgent. That way, you won’t rack up sneaky liquid calories (and ruin your inhibition to resist those mozzarella sticks!). But your H20 doesn’t have to be ho-hum. « Make it festive by ordering the sparkling variety with plenty of fruit, like a lime, lemon, and orange wedge in a martini or highball glass, » adds Newgent.
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Eat this, run that

When you have a 5- or 10K (you get to eat more with a half or full marathon) on your calendar, it’s important to plan out what you’re going to eat the morning of the big day—something that will keep you fueled and also go down easy. While everyone is different, « We always have good luck with a high-carbohydrate breakfast such as a small bowl of oatmeal with fruit or a couple of pieces of toast with peanut butter or cream cheese, » says Andrew Kastor, who also advises eating around 200 to 250 (primarily carb) calories about 90 minutes before you warm up for your run . And don’t worry about nixing your a.m. caffeine fix on race day. « Coffee is great for athletic performances, » Kastor adds, because it makes you sharper and may even give you extended energy. Talk about buzz-worthy!
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Turn your cheat day around

Feeling guilty about that giant ice cream sundae you enjoyed at your niece’s birthday party? Don’t beat yourself up! It takes a lot of calories—3,500—to gain a pound of body fat. « So really, that one off day doesn’t usually result in any significant weight gain, » says Newgent. It’s about what you do the next day and the day after that’s really important—so don’t stay off-track. So be sure to whittle away at those extra calories over the next day or two, preferably by boosting exercise rather than eating too little. Starvation is not the healthy answer!
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Run with this

Before you hit the road, make sure you’re packing these key staples: a watch to log your total time (or a fancy GPS to track your mileage), an iPod with great amp-you-up music, a cell phone if you don’t mind holding onto it, and a RoadID (a bracelet that includes all your vital info, $20; roadid.com). And on a sunny day, wear sunglasses. « They reduce glare, which can decrease squinting, ultimately releasing the tension in your shoulders, » says Andrew Kastor. And that’s a performance bonus, because relaxing them helps conserve energy on your runs. Hey, we’ll take a boost where we can get it!
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Be a weekend warrior

You’ve been following your diet plan to the letter, but enter: the weekend. To deal with three nights of eating temptations (think: birthdays, weddings, dinner parties), up your activity level for the week. For instance, try taking an extra 15-minute walk around your office each day, suggests Newgent. Then, go on and indulge a bit at the soiree, guilt free. Another party trick? Enjoy a 100-calorie snack before a celebration, which can help you eat fewer munchies at the event.
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Fun up your food

It’s easy to get in a diet rut, even if you’re loading up on flavorful fruits and veggies. The solution? Have plenty of spices, fresh herbs, and lemons at your cooking beck and call. « It’s amazing what a little dash of spice, sprinkle of herbs, pinch of lemon zest, or squirt of lime juice can do to liven up a dish—and your diet, » says Newgent. The best part: They contain almost no calories. Experiment with your dinner, tonight!
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Up your exercise

How do you know when to increase your exercise? « The general rule of thumb is to up the amount of miles run, for races half-marathon length and longer, by 5 to 10 percent each week, » advises Andrew Kastor. See our training schedule at Health.com/yes-you-can, which guides you on how to increase your mileage.
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Have a fruity ice cream sundae

Next time your family or friends decide to make an ice-cream run, don’t worry about being left out of the fun! Order a fresh (and super-refreshing) ice cream sundae, piled high with diced kiwi, pineapple, and strawberries. You’ll get a serving of delish fruit—no hefty calorie-laden toppings required.
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Swap out your shoes

While we’ve all heard that running shoes break down after logging lots of miles (about 300 to 350), you may still be holding on to your fave pair. (They fit just right! They’re so cushy!) Not a good idea. « Glue has a tendency to break down under ultraviolet light, as do the other materials that make up the shoe, » says Andrew Kastor. So even if your sneaks have only 150 miles on them but are more than two years old, recycle them (try oneworldrunning.com or recycledrunners.com), because chances are they’ve already started deteriorating. And as a rule of thumb, always keep tabs on how many miles you’ve logged on them—tedious, but hey, you’ll be proud of how far you’ve gone.
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Snag the right support

Sure, your yoga sports bras works great for downward dog—but when it comes to running, you’ll need one that’s designed to lock them in for all that pavement pounding. So what should you look for? « The best sports bras are loose around the chest so you can expand your ribs and diaphragm more effectively. But they should also be form-fitting, » says Deena Kastor, an American marathon record holder and 2004 Olympic marathon bronze medalist. Just make sure the cup is made of comfy material (like a soft compression fabric; look for descriptions that include the terms « breathability » and « compression »)—you don’t want to be itching at mile two!
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Relieve those side stitches

You know it: a sharp pain just below the rib cage that always seems to pop up when you’re working out your hardest. It’s called the side stitch, and it can be a major nuisance—especially when it keeps you from completing a workout. To ease the ache (so you can get on with your run), take your fist and press it beneath your rib cage while taking deep breaths from your belly for about 10 steps. In about 30 seconds, the pain should subside, so you can get on back to (fitness) work.
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Shake your way slim

Sick of that elliptical or bike or workout DVD? That means it’s time to mix up your routine! Our favorite way: Break a sweat by moving and shaking. Simply make a playlist with your favorite « cut a rug » tunes (« Girls Just Want to Have Fun »? « Single Ladies (Put a Ring On It) »?), then turn up the volume, and start breaking it down. For even more fun, invite some gal pals over and get grooving (and laughing). The best part is that you’ll each burn about 200 to 600 calories per hour. Now that’s something to shimmy about!
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Fuel for fitness

Planning on picking up the pace tomorrow? Eat food that will help keep you going strong. For breakfast, opt for a high-carbohydrate meal—one similar to what you’ll be eating on race day, so you can find out what foods digest best (for you!). Try a whole-grain English muffin or a bagel with peanut butter or a low-fat cream cheese. Then, have a well-rounded meal post-workout to help with recovery. Andrew Kastor’s favorite? One to two slices French toast with a side of fruit. « The protein-to-carbohydrate ratio is perfect for enhancing my recovery, » he says. We like that it’s super-yummy, too.
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Say goodbye to peer pressure

Even if you’ve been eating right on track, it may be tough to stay on track if your partner, coworkers, or friends don’t share your healthy-eating habits. What to do? If your partner loves pizza, try ordering a pie that’s heavy on the veggies and light on the cheese—then supplement it with a side salad. Or, if your friends are having a girls’ night out, suggest a restaurant that’s got healthy appetizer options, instead of the typical fare of onion rings and cheese dip. And at work, instead of Friday baked-goods day, suggest a Friday « make it healthy » day, and swap in baked pears with cinnamon or mini fruit-and-nut muffins for brownies and blondies.
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Savor your carbs

When trying to slim and trim, you may be tempted to take drastic measures like cutting out your carbs. But before you go and add dinner rolls and chips to your « no » list, remember that yummy foods like brown rice, pumpernickel bread, and even potato chips contain Resistant Starch, a metabolism-boosting carb that keeps you full for longer. And that’s great for maintaining a fit you because you won’t have to eat as much to feel satiated. So go on, rip open that (single-serve) bag of Lay’s!
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Ditch your working lunch

Munching on your lunch while at the computer could lead to mindless grazing, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. People who ate their midday meals while playing a computer game ended up eating more cookies 30 minutes later than those who hadn’t been gaming. So carve out 20 minutes a day (we know, you’ve got a million things to do, but … ), and eat in your conference room (or outdoors!). Your whittled waistline with thank you.
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Slather up!

There’s no denying it: Getting the fresh air from exercising outdoors is great! But along with it, you also get the harmful UV rays. To keep yourself shielded while still having fun in the sun, opt for a sweat-proof screen with SPF 30 or higher (look out for types that say « water-resistant » or « waterproof » on the bottle, terms regulated by the FDA), a lip balm with SPF 15 or higher, a lightweight hat, and sports shades. Also consider trading in your white tee and instead going for a shirt with built-in UV protection (a rating of 30 UVP is necessary to be awarded the Skin Cancer Foundation’s « Seal of Recommendation »; a white T-shirt has a rating of 10). And remember, the rays are at their brightest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., so try to plan a before-or post-work sweat-session.
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Slim up your snack

It’s hard to avoid that 3 p.m. stomach rumble, when nothing can stand between you and the office vending machine. And while it’s fine to eat something to hold you over until dinner (in fact, we encourage it!), some choices will help you keep on your weight-loss track—while others can surely derail you. So at the vending machine, instead of choosing that ever-so-tempting pack of Twizzlers, try a 100-calorie cookie pack or a Nature Valley granola bar. Better yet, bring a snack from home! We’re fans of sliced veggies dipped in hummus. Delish!
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Run chafe-free

There’s nothing fun about chafing. You can get the rash (caused by moisture and constant friction) on your thighs, around your sports bra, and even under your arms, to name a few hot spots! To prevent the next occurrence, try rubbing on an anti-chafe stick like Bodyglide For Her Anti-Chafing Stick ($9; amazon.com)in any spots that have the potential to chafe. Moisture-wicking fabrics help, too, so if you have a few quick-dry shirts (Nike, Asics, and Under Armour all make ’em), save those for your long runs or tough workouts, when chafing is most likely to occur.

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Find healthy fast food

Have to work late tonight and need dinner—in a hurry? Not to worry. If you find fast food is your only option, pull up the restaurant’s nutrition facts online before you go; you can make an informed decision ahead of time about what to order. « Nearly every quick-service restaurant has a relatively healthful option or two, » says Newgent. We’re thinking salads, chili, or grilled chicken. Some low-cal, healthy, on-the-run dishes: the vegetarian burrito bowl at Chipotle, the Bangkok curry at Noodles and Company, and the tomato basil bisque at Au Bon Pain.
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Be a mighty maintainer

The end is here! Three cheers for all your hard work. But that doesn’t mean it’s time to put on the brakes. To maintain your weight, you still have to make those smart choices at restaurants, work, and home. Look into getting a diet confidante, who you can chat with once a week about your eating highs and oh-no’s. And stick to using that scale so you can be proactive if a few extra pounds creep back on. Don’t let your exercise routine change, either, because even if you don’t have any more pounds to lose, you’ll still be working out your ticker. And we heart that!
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Up your fiber intake

Along with protein and good-for-you fat, fiber is one of those nutrition elements that keeps you full and fueled all day long. And if you’re trying to get fit and shed pounds, fiber is your best friend. In fact, in one an American Heart Association study, participants who consuming 30 grams of fiber a day ended up losing weight and improving their heart health. So when it comes to staying healthy and slim, aim for that 30 gram fiber goal!
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Work out in the morning

Sure, it can be a pain to drag yourself out of bed for a morning workout. But according to a study from Appalachian State University, opting for a 45-minute a.m. sweat sesh could cause a metabolic spike, helping your body continue to burn an additional 190 calories throughout the day.
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Have a hearty breakfast

By now you’re probably tired of hearing how breakfast is the most important meal of the day—but this tired piece of advice couldn’t be more true! In one study completed at the Imperial College of London, participants who skipped breakfast were more tempted to reach for unhealthy, high-calorie foods later in the day. And in case you need more evidence to eat that a.m. meal, further research found that women had a larger drop in ghrelin (the hunger hormone) when they ate a hearty breakfast versus a small one.

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Healty and tips

Nutrition for kids: 5 tips

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Nutrition for kids: 5 tips

1) Stick to concrete ideas

Avoid abstract concepts. Children only start to understand abstract concepts once they reach about 11 or 12 years old. For example some concrete ideas are:

  • Eat lots of different foods every day
  • Eat fruit and vegetables of all colours of the rainbow every day
  • Talking about whole food items
  • Classifying foods by where they come from
  • “Sometimes” and “everyday” foods
  • Note: the classification of foods into everyday or sometimes is an abstract concept, but how often foods are recommended to be eaten is a concrete idea.

Some abstract concepts are:

  • Vitamins and minerals
  • Other nutrients that can’t be seen (e.g. protein, calcium, saturated fat)
  • Classification of foods by nutrients
  • Recommended serve size; daily recommended serves
  • Digestion
  • Chronic disease risk
  • Processes by which food affects health

2) Avoid complicated phrases

Kids can often recite facts and phrases without really understanding them. For example, younger children probably don’t understand what ‘variety’ means and many kids might only know the word ‘diet’ to be a special way of eating (for example to lose weight or for diabetes) rather than a person’s everyday food consumption. Other terms kids might not understand are healthy weight, low fat or low sugar. When talking with your child, keep checking in with them and ask them to explain back to you what they know – that way you’ll get an idea for how much they’ve grasped.

3) Use props!

When referring to a particular food, use the real food item or a picture of the food so your child knows what you’re talking about. Chat about the food you’re preparing and eating for dinner. Ask them how the food grows or where you can find it; discuss seasonal produce and the kinds of environments foods need to grow.

4) Be meaningful

Kids live in the present, so focus on the immediate benefits rather than long term ones. Being strong, growing well and having enough energy to climb the monkey bars are important concepts to kids. They’re less concerned about their longterm disease risk or heart health!

5) Be a role model

Research shows what you eat and do influences children’s habits more than what you say. Studies also show that an authoritative parenting style is also associated with positive dietary results in children. Authoritative parenting doesn’t necessarily need to be overly restrictive nor lax, but it sets some boundaries around the consumption of “sometimes” foods. Families that eat meals together are also associated with children who eat more fruit and vegetables.

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How to Lose Weight Fast: 3 Simple Steps, Based on Science

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There are many ways to lose a lot of weight fast.

However, most of them will make you hungry and unsatisfied.

If you don’t have iron willpower, then hunger will cause you to give up on these plans quickly.

The plan outlined here will:

  • Reduce your appetite significantly.
  • Make you lose weight quickly, without hunger.
  • Improve your metabolic health at the same time.

Here is a simple 3-step plan to lose weight fast.

1. Cut Back on Sugars and Starches

The most important part is to cut back on sugars and starches (carbs).

These are the foods that stimulate secretion of insulin the most. If you didn’t know already, insulin is the main fat storage hormone in the body.

When insulin goes down, fat has an easier time getting out of the fat stores and the body starts burning fats instead of carbs.

Another benefit of lowering insulin is that your kidneys shed excess sodium and water out of your body, which reduces bloat and unnecessary water weight (12).

It is not uncommon to lose up to 10 pounds (sometimes more) in the first week of eating this way, both body fat and water weight.

This is a graph from a study comparing low-carb and low-fat diets in overweight/obese women (3).

The low-carb group is eating until fullness, while the low-fat group is calorie restricted and hungry.

Cut the carbs, lower your insulin and you will start to eat less calories automatically and without hunger (4).

Put simply, lowering your insulin puts fat loss on « autopilot. »

BOTTOM LINE:Removing sugars and starches (carbs) from your diet will lower your insulin levels, kill your appetite and make you lose weight without hunger.

2. Eat Protein, Fat and Vegetables

Each one of your meals should include a protein source, a fat source and low-carb vegetables. Constructing your meals in this way will automatically bring your carb intake into the recommended range of 20-50 grams per day.

Protein Sources:

  • Meat – Beef, chicken, pork, lamb, bacon, etc.
  • Fish and Seafood – Salmon, trout, shrimps, lobsters, etc.
  • Eggs – Omega-3 enriched or pastured eggs are best.

The importance of eating plenty of protein can not be overstated.

This has been shown to boost metabolism by 80 to 100 calories per day (567).

High protein diets can also reduce obsessive thoughts about food by 60%, reduce desire for late-night snacking by half, and make you so full that you automatically eat 441 fewer calories per day… just by adding protein to your diet (89).

When it comes to losing weight, protein is the king of nutrients. Period.

Low-Carb Vegetables:

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Swiss Chard
  • Lettuce
  • Cucumber
  • Celery
  • Full list here.

Don’t be afraid to load your plate with these low-carb vegetables. You can eat massive amounts of them without going over 20-50 net carbs per day.

A diet based on meat and vegetables contains all the fiber, vitamins and minerals you need to be healthy. There is no physiological need for grains in the diet.

Fat Sources:

  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Butter
  • Tallow

Eat 2-3 meals per day. If you find yourself hungry in the afternoon, add a 4th meal.

Don’t be afraid of eating fat, trying to do both low-carb AND low-fat at the same time is a recipe for failure. It will make you feel miserable and abandon the plan.

The best cooking fat to use is coconut oil. It is rich in fats called medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs). These fats are more fulfilling than others and can boost metabolism slightly (1011).

There is no reason to fear these natural fats, new studies show that saturated fat doesn’t raise your heart disease risk at all (1213).

To see how you can assemble your meals, check out this low carb meal plan and this list of 101 low carb recipes.

BOTTOM LINE:Assemble each meal out of a protein source, a fat source and a low-carb vegetable. This will put you into the 20-50 gram carb range and drastically lower your insulin levels.

3. Lift Weights 3 Times Per Week

You don’t need to exercise to lose weight on this plan, but it is recommended.

The best option is to go to the gym 3-4 times a week. Do a warm up, lift weights, then stretch.

If you’re new to the gym, ask a trainer for some advice.

By lifting weights, you will burn a few calories and prevent your metabolism from slowing down, which is a common side effect of losing weight (1415).

Studies on low-carb diets show that you can even gain a bit of muscle while losing significant amounts of body fat (16).

If lifting weights is not an option for you, then doing some easier cardio workouts like running, jogging, swimming or walking will suffice.

BOTTOM LINE:It is best to do some sort of resistance training like weight lifting. If that is not an option, cardio workouts work too.

Optional – Do a « Carb Re-feed » Once Per Week

You can take one day « off » per week where you eat more carbs. Many people prefer Saturday.

It is important to try to stick to healthier carb sources like oats, rice, quinoa, potatoes, sweet potatoes, fruits, etc.

But only this one higher carb day, if you start doing it more often than once per week then you’re not going to see much success on this plan.

If you must have a cheat meal and eat something unhealthy, then do it on this day.

Be aware that cheat meals or carb refeeds are NOT necessary, but they can up-regulate some fat burning hormones like leptin and thyroid hormones (1718).

You will gain some weight during your re-feed day, but most of it will be water weight and you will lose it again in the next 1-2 days.

BOTTOM LINE:Having one day of the week where you eat more carbs is perfectly acceptable, although not necessary.

What About Calories and Portion Control?

It is NOT necessary to count calories as long as you keep the carbs very low and stick to protein, fat and low-carb vegetables.

However, if you really want to, then use this calculator.

Enter your details, then pick the number from either the « Lose Weight » or the « Lose Weight Fast » section – depending on how fast you want to lose.

There are many great tools you can use to track the amount of calories you are eating. Here is a list of 5 calorie counters that are free and easy to use.

The main goal is to keep carbs under 20-50 grams per day and get the rest of your calories from protein and fat.

BOTTOM LINE:It is not necessary to count calories to lose weight on this plan. It is most important to strictly keep your carbs in the 20-50 gram range.

10 Weight Loss Tips to Make Things Easier (and Faster)

Here are 10 more tips to lose weight even faster:

  1. Eat a high-protein breakfast. Eating a high-protein breakfast has been shown to reduce cravings and calorie intake throughout the day (192021).
  2. Avoid sugary drinks and fruit juice. These are the most fattening things you can put into your body, and avoiding them can help you lose weight (2223).
  3. Drink water a half hour before meals. One study showed that drinking water a half hour before meals increased weight loss by 44% over 3 months (24).
  4. Choose weight loss-friendly foods (see list). Certain foods are very useful for losing fat. Here is a list of the 20 most weight loss-friendly foods on earth.
  5. Eat soluble fiber. Studies show that soluble fibers may reduce fat, especially in the belly area. Fiber supplements like glucomannan can also help (252627).
  6. Drink coffee or tea. If you’re a coffee or tea drinker, then drink as much as you want as the caffeine in them can boost your metabolism by 3-11% (282930).
  7. Eat mostly whole, unprocessed foods. Base most of your diet on whole foods. They are healthier, more filling and much less likely to cause overeating.
  8. Eat your food slowly. Fast eaters gain more weight over time. Eating slowly makes you feel more full and boosts weight-reducing hormones (313233).
  9. Use smaller plates. Studies show that people automatically eat less when they use smaller plates. Strange, but it works (34).
  10. Get a good night’s sleep, every night. Poor sleep is one of the strongest risk factors for weight gain, so taking care of your sleep is important (3536).

Even more tips here: 30 Easy Ways to Lose Weight Naturally (Backed by Science).

BOTTOM LINE:It is most important to stick to the three rules, but there are a few other things you can do to speed things up.

How Fast You Will Lose (and Other Benefits)
Obese vs thin woman

You can expect to lose 5-10 pounds of weight (sometimes more) in the first week, then consistent weight loss after that.

I can personally lose 3-4 lbs per week for a few weeks when I do this strictly.

If you’re new to dieting, then things will probably happen quickly. The more weight you have to lose, the faster you will lose it.

For the first few days, you might feel a bit strange. Your body has been burning carbs for all these years, it can take time for it to get used to burning fat instead.

It is called the « low carb flu » and is usually over within a few days. For me it takes 3. Adding some sodium to your diet can help with this, such as dissolving a bouillon cube in a cup of hot water and drinking it.

After that, most people report feeling very good, positive and energetic. At this point you will officially have become a « fat burning beast. »

Despite the decades of anti-fat hysteria, the low-carb diet also improves your health in many other ways:

  • Blood Sugar tends to go way down on low-carb diets (3738).
  • Triglycerides tend to go down (3940).
  • Small, dense LDL (the bad) Cholesterol goes down (4142).
  • HDL (the good) cholesterol goes up (43).
  • Blood pressure improves significantly (4445).
  • To top it all off, low-carb diets appear to be easier to follow than low-fat diets.

BOTTOM LINE:You can expect to lose a lot of weight, but it depends on the person how quickly it will happen. Low-carb diets also improve your health in many other ways.

You Don’t Need to Starve Yourself to Lose Weight

If you have a medical condition then talk to your doctor before making changes because this plan can reduce your need for medication.

By reducing carbs and lowering insulin levels, you change the hormonal environment and make your body and brain « want » to lose weight.

This leads to drastically reduced appetite and hunger, eliminating the main reason that most people fail with conventional weight loss methods.

This is proven to make you lose about 2-3 times as much weight as a typical low-fat, calorie restricted diet (464748).

Another great benefit for the impatient folks is that the initial drop in water weight can lead to a big difference on the scale as early as the next morning.

Here are a few examples of low-carb meals that are simple, delicious and can be prepared in under 10 minutes: 7 Healthy Low-Carb Meals in 10 Minutes or Less.

On this plan, you can eat good food until fullness and still lose a ton of fat. Welcome to paradise.

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